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NATV 522: Indigenous Community Approaches to Restorative Justice

Search Strategies

Search Tips:

  • Before you start your search, try to compile a list of potential keywords of Indigenous communities & Topics
  • Start with a Keyword Search. Simple and broader keyword terms are good.
    • Using "?" after a keyword retrieves both singular and plural forms. For example, Indian? education retrieves, Indian and Indians.
    • Combine a Indigenous name with a topical word (e.g., Navajo Government)
  • Remember to use the limiters in the library catalog and databases. They will help you refine your search.
  • Use quotation marks to search for exact phrases (e.g., "Navajo Government") will retrieve search items with Navajo + Government.
  • When searching the library catalog, pay attention to the subject headings assigned to relevant titles. Refining your search using the same subject heading terminology may yield more precise results

 

Subject Search:

Browsing the Headings in subject search results can be especially useful for cross referencing system. Meaning you can get related or alternative content and headings with a subject search.

"Indian" also qualifies many specific headings, either as a main heading (e.g. Indian Art, Indian Courts) or a sub-heading (e.g. American Literature -- Indian Authors) .

 

Common Subject Headings for Native American Studies and Indigenous Community Approaches to Restorative Justice:

  • "Indians of North America -- Politics and government"
  • "Indians of North America -- Government relations"
  • "Indians of North America Legal status, laws, etc."
  • "Indian Courts" and "Indian Courts -- United States"
  • "Indian country (United States Law)"
  • "Restorative Justice" and "Restorative Justice -- Canada"
  • "Indians of North America -- Civil Rights"
  • "Indigenous  peoples -- Legal Status, laws. etc"
  • "Indigenous peoples -- Government relations -- Congresses"